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Jesus is my Yom Kippur

Yom KippurYom Kippur 2018 (Hebrew year 5779) begins in the evening of Tuesday September 18 and ends in the evening of Wednesday September 19.

Yom Kippur is known as the Day of Atonement. This holiday is outlined in Leviticus 16 although the modern day Jewish observance bears little resemblance to that. Leviticus 17:11 sums it up in brief: For the soul of the flesh is in the blood, and I have therefore given it to you [to be placed] upon the altar, to atone for your souls. For it is the blood that atones for the soul.”

The ending of animal sacrifices occurred after the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem in year 70 by the Romans as there was no longer a temple altar designated by God in which to offer the sacrifice.

Thus began the religion we would call Rabbinic Judaism. Rabbis replaced the priests as the religious leaders of Judaism. (Priests inherited their position from their father’s side of the family.  Rabbis were chosen.) Prayers replaced animal and grain sacrifices. The Jewish holidays remained the same in the transition from Biblical Judaism to Rabbinic Judaism, but their ritual content changed. The concept of atonement also was changed.

Atonement could no longer be accomplished by slaughtering animals or by the death of any surrogate, according to the Rabbis. Now, the way to atone for sins committed against another became to ask forgiveness from the person you had hurt (always a good idea regardless!) For sins against God, atonement could be achieved by confessional prayers to God and doing good works/giving charity. Rabbis stand on Hosea 6:6 to state that a blood sacrifice was no longer necessary after the Temple was destroyed. “For I desire loving-kindness, and not sacrifices, and knowledge of God more than burnt offerings.” Knowledge of God.

In the Tanach (Old Testament), there are many specific blood sacrifices listed and each one was a covering over the particular sin or sins, an atonement. This is why the sacrifices had to be repeated, and this is why there is the annual Jewish holiday, Yom Kippur, the day of Atonement.

The shadow of the Tanach/Old Testament sacrifices point to the New Testament.

God made it clear that He would be forming a new covenant with a new heart and His spirit placed within us (Jeremiah 31:30-33 Tanakh [Jeremiah 31:31-34 OT], Jeremiah 32:37-40, Jeremiah 33:14-16, Ezekiel 16:58-63, Ezekiel 36:26-29, Ezekiel 37:21-26, Isaiah 55:3-8.) The location to perform animal sacrifices being destroyed and no longer existing did not take God by surprise. It was part of His plan.

Isaiah 53. “Despised and rejected by men, pained because of our transgressions, crushed because of our iniquities; the chastisement of our welfare was upon him, and with his wound we were healed. We all went astray like sheep, we have turned, each one on his way, and the Lord accepted his prayers for the iniquity of all of us. He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he would not open his mouth; like a lamb to the slaughter he would be brought, He committed no violence, and there was no deceit in his mouth. He poured out his soul to death, and with transgressors he was counted; and he bore the sin of many, and interceded for the transgressors.”

The saving death of the Messiah is the final atonement, for it is the propitiation, the quenching of God’s wrath for us when He completely removed our sins and took them upon Himself (expiation.) Our entire body of sin was imputed onto Him and His righteousness was imputed onto us.

Over 300 prophecies stated in the Tanakh (Tanach, Old Testament) were fulfilled by one named Jesus.

Our eternal God became man (incarnation) for our salvation; sinless, born under the Law, to fulfill the Law perfectly (Genesis 49:10.)

Crucified, died, resurrected, alive seated at the right hand of the Father (Psalm 110:1), fully God, fully man (Daniel 7:13-14, Isaiah 52:6-7, Isaiah 9:5 Tanakh [Isaiah 9:6 OT].)

By faith, we are able to be reconciled to God forever. Just as Abram back in Genesis 15, by faith.

THIS IS SUCH GOOD NEWS!!!

To trace the theme of blood sacrifice from Genesis on, please visit this page Sacrifice”

May this bring a deepening meaning and preciousness to you and your life as it has for me.

 

 

Spelling of THE NAME

The NameWriting G-d and L-rd instead of His name in full is a sign of respect in Jewish culture when writing out His name on something that can be destroyed, like a piece of paper, or a page in a book.

Judaism does not prohibit writing the name of G-d, it prohibits only erasing or defacing a name of G-d. However, some avoid writing any name of His casually because of the risk that the written name might later be defaced, obliterated or destroyed accidentally. The commandment not to erase or deface the name of G-d comes from Deuteronomy 12:3. From this, rabbis inferred that we are commanded not to destroy any holy thing, and not to erase or deface His name.

This rabbinic prohibition applies only to what is written in some kind of permanent form, and rabbis decided that writing on a computer is not a permanent form. However, once you print the document out, it becomes a permanent form. That is why many will avoid writing the name out. Generally I will write the name “God” on this website/blog.

 

 

Judaism

judaismRabbinic Judaism is the Jewish religion along with the expression of Jewish identity. The foundation is the Tanakh, also spelled Tanach (Old Testament) Scriptures, however the religious interpretation and practices center around the teachings of Rabbis (Talmud, also known as Oral Law). Therefore it is called Rabbinic Judaism.

The three main branches of Rabbinic Judaism are Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform. Laws, rules, and traditions are modified or removed, depending on each branch. These all believe that both the Tanakh and the Talmud were revealed to Moses by God on Mount Sinai. Orthodox and Conservative Judaism maintain that the Jewish law (Halakha or Halakkah) should be followed, with Conservative Judaism promoting a more “modern” and less restrictive interpretation of it’s requirements than the Orthodox. Reform Judaism is more liberal and views Jewish law as a set of general guidelines rather than required literal observance.

Other Rabbinic Jewish groups include: Karaite Judaism which maintains that only the written Torah (Tanakh) was revealed to Moses by God (they do not accept the Talmud), Humanistic Judaism which is non theistic (not believing in the existence of God), and Reconstructionist Judaism which believes that Judaism is an “evolving religious civilization” which does not believe in a personified deity that is active in history, and they do not believe that God “chose” the Jewish people.

What is of grave concern is that while there is much beauty in the religious traditions, in the focus on the religion and the religion alone, the meaning of the experience being upheld, why to uphold it, how firmly and perfectly means it was upheld, and where does one go from here, is all unclear. Yet, Tanakh/Hebrew scripture is clear on that there is an eternal destination, and is equally clear that we cannot behave our way there on our own merits.  There is a conflict, a dichotomy between the Jewish religion, regardless of which branch or group of Rabbinic Judaism, and what our Hebrew scriptures say.

This brings us to:
Messianic Judaism is the belief system along with the expression of Jewish identity that encompasses both the Tanakh (Tanach, Old Testament (OT) Hebrew Scriptures), and the New Testament (NT, New Covenant, B’rit Chadasha, Greek Scriptures), so 66 books of the Bible in all.

Messianic Judaism is not about being intermarried or the child of an intermarriage and combining two worlds into one, this is for anyone who after delving deep into the scriptures of the Tanakh finds themselves with some pressing questions or the feeling that there might be a missing piece to the puzzle.

The 66 books of the Bible, are the inspired, the only infallible, authoritative Word of God. It is the supreme and final authority on all matters on which it speaks. (Jeremiah 31:30-33 Tanakh [31-34 OT], Jeremiah 32:37-40, Jeremiah 33:14-16, Ezekiel 16:58-63, Ezekiel 36:26-29, Ezekiel 37:21-26, Isaiah 55:3-8, 2 Timothy 3:16-17.)

The Shema, “Hear O Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one” (Deuteronomy 6:4), teaches that God is Echad, as so declared: a united one, a composite unity, eternally existent in plural oneness. The three form one as does 1 x 1 x 1 = 1. [Genesis 1:1 (Elohim: God); Genesis 1:26 “Let Us make man in Our image”; Genesis 2:24 Adam & Eve were created to be as one flesh (basar echad), Isaiah 48:16 “Draw near to Me, hearken to this; in the beginning I did not speak in secret, from the time it was, there was I, and now, the Lord God has sent me, and His spirit.“]

The Jewish holidays and traditions are honoring to God, are important for cultural identity, are totally biblical, and often give us a deeper understanding of God and our history. However the focus is not on the “religion” of the holidays.